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Coronation

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Original Source:

The Baroness' poems and papers are contained in the Archives and Manuscripts Department at the University of Maryland Libraries. Complete papers cover the period from 1917-1933 and consist of manuscripts, drafts, notes, correspondence, drawings and photographs.

Textual transcription and analysis of the seven poems encoded here were undertaken in Fall 2003 by graduate students in William H. Sherman's English 601 class, "Literary Research and Critical Contexts."

Text editing of "Coronation" was performed by Christina Painton.

Witness a1: Coronation: Handwritten Original Version by the Baroness ()
Witness a2: Coronation: Handwritten by the Baroness () ()
Witness a3: Coronation: Handwritten by the Baroness () ()
Witness a4: Coronation: Handwritten by the Baroness () ()
Witness a5: Coronation: Final Version Handwritten by the Baroness () ()
Witness a6: Coronation: Version Typewritten by Djuna Barnes ()
Witness a7: Coronation: Ideal Text, culled from Versions a5 and a6 by Christina Painton

Textual Notes: There are seven versions of "Coronation," presented here in the following order: five handwritten by the Baroness (in the order of first to last draft, as determined by the editor), followed by one typewritten version by Djuna Barnes, followed by an "Ideal Text" culled by the editor from the Baroness' final version and Barnes' typed version. Titles of all versions are "Coronation"; none are dated. The poem is unpublished.

The following is an excerpt from Christina Painton's transcription rationale:

Six versions of "Coronation" were found among Djuna Barnes' papers.... Although "Coronation" was unpublished, the Baroness may have intended to submit it. On the backside of what I deem the final version of "Coronation" [Version a5], she wrote in an undated letter to Djuna Barnes, "I consider this important. "Liberator" has some beloved poems in its smirchy pages"....Although it is unknown if "Coronation" was ever submitted for publication, Barnes typed the handwritten final manuscript, making several changes in the process. The piece presented here is an "Ideal Text" of Barnes' typewritten transcription and the Baroness' final handwritten version (Version a7); all notes are my editorial additions.

The Baroness' spelling conventions (or lack thereof) presented the principal editorial challenges of this piece. Words such as "Saphir," "Cloggs," "Arist," and "ametyst" are unusual at best and nonexistent at worst. Clearly these terms require annotations, but I felt the Baroness's compound words such as "Smoketopazgray" and "Slatevapormist," although undefined in the Oxford English Dictionary, were comprehensible and did not require further explanation.



Read Christina Painton's essay "Contamination or Clarification? Editorial Challenges Presented by 'Coronation.'"

Additions appear in a green, fixed-width font. Deletions appear in a red, fixed-width font with strikethrough.

Electronic Edition Information
Encoded by Jennifer Agresta.
All annotations by Christina Painton, except those explicitly prefaced with "Encoder's Note."

Published by Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Researchers can gain access to the Papers of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven in the Maryland Room, Hornbake Library, University of Maryland Libraries, College Park, MD 20742

"Coronation" manuscripts located in Series III, Box One, Folder 48; microfiche id numbers 3/702-3/712.

Special Collections at the University of Maryland provides more information about the microfilm edition of the papers.

Images and manuscripts drafts of this poem may not be reproduced or downloaded and used on another site without the explicit permission of UMD Archives. Though the intellectual property of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven is in the public domain, all annotations and editorial commentary are copyrighted.


2004Encoding Principles

DTD constructed from TEI poetry base with tagsets for linking, figures, analysis, transcr, textcrit.


X Version
View ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView Images CORONATION . g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.
CORONATION g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.
CORONATION . g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.
CORONATION g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.
CORONATION c The Baroness penned a letter to Djuna Barnes on the reverse of this version. A photo of the letter is available by clicking on the second image icon of this version; here is the text of the letter:

DJUNA — I ADORE THIS! THERE IS IN IT DIGNIFIED SOFT SILENCE OF SNOWSWATH xxxxx— THAT DIMS SOUND—ENOBLING IT CRISTAL—CHIMES —! CHIMES ON SLEDGES — SNOW SOFT DIGNIFIED GAIETY INVENTED THEM — NOT AT ALL NECESSITY. FOR CAUTION! SHIT. IF—IT WAS SOON FORGOTTEN! SNOW– MAGIC ENHANCING IT IN BEAUTY. I KNOW IT FROM OUR SLEIGH CHIMES! SILVER SOUND JINGLE COUNTED—FOR JOY OF IT! LISTEN. I CONSIDER THIS IMPORTANT. "LIBERATOR" HAS SOME BELOVED POEMS IN ITS SMIRCHY PAGES—

g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.

Co ronat ion g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.
Coronation g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in addition to the traditional meaning, a coronation is a crowning of a work, completion.

1 DEDICATED TO "LESS' IN THE CABIN"
1
1
1
1
1
1

1 WHITE
1 WHITE
1 WHITE
1 WHITE
1 WHITE
1 Wh u i te
1 White
2 SILENCE
2 SILENCE
2 SILENCE
2 SILENCE
2 SILENCE
2 Silence
2 Silence
3 SHEATHES SHEATHES SWATHES
3 SHEATHES
3 SHEATHES
3 SHEATHES
3 SHEATHES
3 Sheath e s
3 Sheathes
4 COUNTRY
4 COUNTRY
4 COUNTRY——   ——–
4 COUNTRY
4 COUNTRY –
4 Country-
4 Country-
5 CRADLES
5 CRADLES
5 CRADLES
5 CRADLES
5 CRADLES
5 Cradles
5 Cradles
6 CLIFFS
6 CLIFFS
6 CLIFFS ——–
6 CLIFFS
6 CLIFFS  –
6 Cliffs-
6 Cliffs-
7 LOOMS FROM xxxx
7 LOOMS
7 LOOMS
7 LOOMS
7 LOOMS
7 Looms
7 Looms
8
8 FROM
8 FROM
8 FROM
8 FROM FROM ABOVE UP
8 From
8 From
9 SPIDERTREE
9 SPIDERTREE
9 SPIDERTREE ———
9 SPIDERTREE
9 SPIDERTREE
9 Spidertree
9 Spidertree
10 SOFT
10
10
10
10
10 Soft
10 Soft
11 AGAINT
11 AGAINST
11 AGAINST
11 AGAINST
11 AGAINST
11 Against
11 Against
12 SKY
12 SKY
12 SKY  ——–
12 SKY
12 SKY  –
12 Sky-
12 Sky-
13 SEMITRANSLUCENT g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 SEMITRANSLUCENT g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 SEMI-TRANSLUCENT – g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 SEMI TRANS LUCENT g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 SEMITRANSLUCENT g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 Semitranslucent g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
13 Semitranslucent g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "semitranslucent" was used in 1832 in the Nat. Philos. Thermom. & Pyrom. i. 9 (U.K.S.).
14 SMOKETOPAZGRAY .
14 SMOKETOPAZGRAY —
14 SMOKETOPAZGRAY —–
14 SMOKETOPAZGRAY .
14 SMOKETOPAZGRAY !
14 Smoketopazgray.
14 Smoketopazgray.
15 PANSY
15 PANSY
15 PANSY -
15 PANSY    –
15 PANSY -
15 Pansy
15 Pansy-
16 SAPHIRE
16 SAPHIR
16 SAPHIR -
16 SAPHIR    –
16 SAPHIR -
16 Saphir
16 Saphir- g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, is one form of the word philosopher; also a form of sapphire; or the general name for all the precious transparent varieties of crystals.
17 CRIMSON
17 CRIMSON
17 CRIMSON -
17 CRIMSON    –
17 CRIMSON -
17 Crimson-
17 Crimson-
18 EMERALD
18 EMERALD
18 EMERALD
18 EMERALD     –
18 EMERALD -
18 Emerald -
18 Emerald –
19 LIGHT
19 LIGHT
19 LIGHT —–
19 LIGHT     –  – – - -
19 LIGHT   -  -  -  -


19 Light----
19 Light----
20 xxxxx
20
20
20
20
20
20
21 TRAIN
21 TRAIN
21 TRAIN
21 TRAIN
21 TRAIN
21 Train s
21 Trains
22 CLOGGS g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 CLOGGS g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 CLOGGS g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 CLOGGS g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 CLOGGS g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 Cloggs g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
22 Cloggs g This spelling not found in the Oxford English Dictionary. The Baroness is known to have experimented with dada phonetic poetry (see "to Home"), as developed by Hugo Ball (see "Hugo Ball," Ubu Web, www.ubu.com/sound/ball.htm). If applying the principles of dada phonetic poetry here, "Cloggs" is the use of spelling to create the sound of the train as it disappears in the mist.
23 AWAY
23 AWAY
23 AWAY –
23 AWAY  – – – – - -
23 AWAY  ——
23 Away---
23 Away---
24 INTO .
24 INTO
24 INTO
24 INTO
24 INTO
24 Into
24 Into
25 xxxxx H SLATE-VAPOR
25 SLATEVAPORMIST
25 SLATE-VAPORMIST     – – -


25 SLATEVAPORMIST  – – – -
25 SLATEVAPORMIST - - - -
25 Slatevapormist---
25 Slatevapormist---
26 MIST
26
26
26
26
26
26
27 ATOP
27 ATOP
27 ATOP
27 ATOP  –
27 ATOP –
27 Atop-
27 Atop-
28 AGOG g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 AGOG g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 AGOG g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 AGOG  – g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 AGOG – g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 Agog- g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
28 Agog- g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, in eager readiness, expectation, or desire; on the move, astir.
29 ARIST g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 ARIST g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 ARIST —– g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 ARIST  – g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 ARIST – g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 Arist- g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
29 Arist- g According to the Oxford English Dictionary, rising, to rise from a seat or from bed; sunrise; or rising from the dead, resurrection.
30 BALLOONSIZE :
30 BALLOONSIZE
30 xxxxxxxxxxx
30
30 BALLOONSIZE  – —
30
30
31 SMOKE TOAD STOOL SMOKE
31 TOADSTOOL
31 TOADSTOOL –
31 SMOKETOADSTOOLS
31 SMOKE TOADSTOOL—
31 Smoketoadstool
31 Smoketoadstool
32 SMOKE SMOKE FOG AMETYST . g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 FOG SMOKE AMETYST g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 SMOKE FOG AMETYST g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 FOGAMETYST . g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 FOGAMETYST . g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 Fogamethyst. g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


32 Fogamethyst. g Encoder's Note: From the original version (version a1) through the last handwritten version (version a5), the Baroness consistently employed the word "ametyst." In her typewritten transcription (version a6), Djuna Barnes interpreted this word as a misspelling or version of the word "amethyst," which was transcribed by Christina Painton in her Ideal Text of "Coronation" (version a7).


33
33
33
33
33 ————
33
33
34 HUDSON
34 HUDSON
34 HUDSON
34 HUDSON
34 HUDSON
34 Hudson
34 Hudson
35 DEEP
35 DEEP
35 DEEP
35 DEEP
35 DEEP
35 Deep
35 Deep
36 ASLEEP
36 ASLEEP
36 ASLEEP
36 ASLEEP
36 ASLEEP
36 Alleep Asleep
36 Asleep
37 IN
37 IN
37 IN
37 IN
37 IN
37 In
37 In
38 ICE .
38 ICE .
38 ICE
38 ICE  .
38 ICE .
38 Ice.
38 Ice.

39 ELSE - BARONESS
39
39
39 E.
39 E.V.F.L.
39
39
40 VON FREYTAG -
40
40
40 V.
40
40
40
41
41
41
41 F.
41
41
41
42 LORINGHOVEN
42
42
42 L.
42
42
42
43
43
43
43
43
43 . . .
43
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