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Bibliographic InformationX

OSTENTATIOUS

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Original Source:

The Baroness' poems and papers are contained in the Archives and Manuscripts Department at the University of Maryland Libraries. Complete papers cover the period from 1917-1933 and consist of manuscripts, drafts, notes, correspondence, drawings and photographs.

Textual transcription and analysis of the seven poems encoded here were undertaken in Fall 2003 by graduate students in William H. Sherman's English 601 class, "Literary Research and Critical Contexts."

Text editing of "Ostentatious" was performed by Jennifer Gavin.

Witness m5-208: OSTENTATIOUS ()
Witness m5-207: OSTENTATIOUS ()
Witness m5-206: OSTENTATIOUS ()
Witness m5-205: OSTENTATIOUS ()
Witness m5-203: OSTENTATIOUS ()

Textual Notes: “Ostentatious” in five versions on five separate leaves, appearing in VM as first draft to last, as thought by the editor); ca. 1926-1927 (Maryland Book Room dating). If the Baroness wrote “Ostentatious” in 1926, it would have been written as she was preparing to leave Berlin. However, the first version of “Ostentatious” resides on a page with first versions of “Café du Dome” and “Ancestry,” the former based upon a Parisian café. The later estimation of 1927 would mean that the poem was written with the first year of her residence in Paris shortly before her death. Djuna Barnes took possession of the Baroness’s papers, and unsuccessfully attempted to write the Baroness’s biography. This may explain the notes written in dark green script on version D; experts in the Maryland room attribute notes on here to Djuna Barnes. The notes read: “I spooked (10)/I am adrift, God is so slow/with me (16) (18)/Photo made by Andre Kertesz/5 rue de Vanues/P.14/Cast by Oscar Stornoro”. This would also suggest a 1927 origin because of the allusions to Parisian photograph, particularly if Barnes’s notes are cross-references in her data collection for the Baroness’s biography.

The following is an excerpt from Jennifer Gavin's transcription rationale: Version m5-208: One-stanza and the most "raw" in that there are lines and phrases crossed out, added and replaced. All black-ink, with no signature. Shares page with versions of "Café du Dome" and "Ancestry." Version m5-207: One-stanza version in upper left-hand corner of page. Punctuation in green, signature "E.V.L.F." in green and underlined in red. This version is followed by notes by Djuna Barnes (see provenance entry above). Version m5-206: One-stanza version to the upper left of the page, with punctuation in green. Signature "E.V.F.L." underlined in red ink. Version m5-205: This version separates the poem by showing the words "WESTWARD" and "EASTWARD" stepping outside to the right and left of the poem, respectively. Contains no punctuation. No signature. Version m5-203: appears to be the most recent. Contains four stanzas dispersed spatially on the page, with the last stanza blotted out in black ink in a 1-inch by 1.5-inch square. Punctuation in red ink. No signature.

Created on thin, off-white and slightly-yellowed typing paper; 8 x 10 leaves; text occupies approximately a quarter or third of the page, with wide margins and surrounded by blank space; 5 leaves. Presentation: Freytag-Loringhoven’s handwriting is in even, regular block lettering whose register is well-spaced, in black ink except for a signature. Punctuation, if it exists, is in green or red ink.



Read Jennifer Gavin's essay "Chasing the Baroness: Editing Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven's 'Ostentatious.'"

Additions appear in a green, fixed-width font. Deletions appear in a red, fixed-width font with strikethrough.

Electronic Edition Information
Encoded by Dan Wendling
All annotations by Jennifer Gavin except those explicitly prefaced with "Encoder's Note."

Published by Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Researchers can gain access to the Papers of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven in the Maryland Room, Hornbake Library, University of Maryland Libraries, College Park, MD 20742

OSTENTATIOUS manuscripts located in Series III, Box 3, Folder 17; microfiche id numbers 5/203-5/208.

Special Collections at the University of Maryland provides more information about the microfilm edition of the papers.

Images and manuscripts drafts of this poem may not be reproduced or downloaded and used on another site without the explicit permission of UMD Archives. They may not be reproduced or downloaded and used on another site without the explicit permission of UMD Archives. Though the intellectual property of Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven is in the public domain, all annotations and editorial commentary are copyrighted.


2004Encoding Principles

DTD constructed from TEI poetry base with tagsets for linking, figures, analysis, transcr, textcrit.


X Version
View ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView ImagesView Images OSTENTATIOUS g OSTENTATIOUS—adj. Conspicuous, showy. In the poem, the word describes the unabashed self-awareness in the artistic expression of that which fills and pleases the senses. Earlier versions of the poem in its rawest form are not separated into stanzas which span the page, but one stanza justified to the left.
OSTENTATIOUS g OSTENTATIOUS—adj. Conspicuous, showy. In the poem, the word describes the unabashed self-awareness in the artistic expression of that which fills and pleases the senses. Earlier versions of the poem in its rawest form are not separated into stanzas which span the page, but one stanza justified to the left.
OSTENTATIOUS g OSTENTATIOUS—adj. Conspicuous, showy. In the poem, the word describes the unabashed self-awareness in the artistic expression of that which fills and pleases the senses. Earlier versions of the poem in its rawest form are not separated into stanzas which span the page, but one stanza justified to the left.
OSTENTATIOUS g OSTENTATIOUS—adj. Conspicuous, showy. In the poem, the word describes the unabashed self-awareness in the artistic expression of that which fills and pleases the senses. Earlier versions of the poem in its rawest form are not separated into stanzas which span the page, but one stanza justified to the left.
OSTENTATIOUS g OSTENTATIOUS—adj. Conspicuous, showy. In the poem, the word describes the unabashed self-awareness in the artistic expression of that which fills and pleases the senses. Earlier versions of the poem in its rawest form are not separated into stanzas which span the page, but one stanza justified to the left.

1 ALOFT:
1
1
1
1
2 VIVID FALLS
2 VIVID FALL'S
2 VIVID FALL'S
2 VIVID FALLS
2 VIVID FALL'S
3 BUGLE SKY —
3 BUGLE SKY —
3 BUGLE SKY —
3
3 BUGLE SKY —
4 BELOW:
4
4
4
4
5 CASTLE CLOUDS
5 CASTLE CLOUD'S
5 CASTLE CLOUD'S
5 CASTLE CLOUDS
5 CASTLE CLOUD'S
6 LEAFY LIMBSWISH —— g LIMBSWISH—n. hiss made by a slender object (here, a leafy limb) or switch’s swift movement brushing through the air.
6 LEAFY LIMBSWISH —— g LIMBSWISH—n. hiss made by a slender object (here, a leafy limb) or switch’s swift movement brushing through the air.
6 LEAFY LIMBSWISH —— g LIMBSWISH—n. hiss made by a slender object (here, a leafy limb) or switch’s swift movement brushing through the air.
6 LEAFY LIMBSWISH g LIMBSWISH—n. hiss made by a slender object (here, a leafy limb) or switch’s swift movement brushing through the air.
6 LEAFY LIMBSWISH ——  —— g LIMBSWISH—n. hiss made by a slender object (here, a leafy limb) or switch’s swift movement brushing through the air.
7
7
7
7
7
8 WESTWARD :
8 WESTWARD :
8 WESTWARD :
8

WESTWARD

8

WESTWARD :

9 SAXOPHONE DAY'S STEEL BLAST GALAXY
9 SAXOPHONEDAY'S STEELBLAST GALAXY ——
9 SAXOPHONE DAY'S STEELBLAST GALAXY
9 SAXOPHONE DAYS
9 SAXOPHONE DAY'S
10
10
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10 STEALBLAST
10 STEELBLAST
11
11
11
11 GALAXY g GALAXY—n. 1.celestial beings of the Milky Way. 2.dazzling gathering of beautiful women or glamorous celebrities.
11 GALAXY —— g GALAXY—n. 1.celestial beings of the Milky Way. 2.dazzling gathering of beautiful women or glamorous celebrities.
12
12
12
12


12


13 EASTWARD :
13 EASTWARD :
13 EASTWARD :
13 EASTWARD
13 EASTWARD :
14 BIG SHE-MOON'S CHEEK FLUSHED TRAVESTY 'S g TRAVESTY—n. 1.irreverant or playful caricature of a serious literary work. 2.theatrical role which calls for portrayal of one’s opposite gender.
14 BIG SHE-MOONS CHEEKFLUSHED TRAVESTY g TRAVESTY—n. 1.irreverant or playful caricature of a serious literary work. 2.theatrical role which calls for portrayal of one’s opposite gender.
14 BIG SHE-MOON'S CHEEKFLUSHED TRAVESTY g TRAVESTY—n. 1.irreverant or playful caricature of a serious literary work. 2.theatrical role which calls for portrayal of one’s opposite gender.
14 BIG SH
14 BIG SHE-MOON'S
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15
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15 SHE-MOONS
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16 CHEEKFLUSHED
16 CHEEKFLUSHED
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17 TRAVESTY g TRAVESTY—n. 1.irreverant or playful caricature of a serious literary work. 2.theatrical role which calls for portrayal of one’s opposite gender.
17 TRAVESTY g TRAVESTY—n. 1.irreverant or playful caricature of a serious literary work. 2.theatrical role which calls for portrayal of one’s opposite gender.
18 FLAMBOYANT STRUMPET
18
18
18
18
19 WAXING
19
19
19
19
20 ALONG GOG
20 AGOG g AGOG—adv. 1. merrily, as in eager and wanton desire. 2.in joyful anticipation.
20 AGOG g AGOG—adv. 1. merrily, as in eager and wanton desire. 2.in joyful anticipation.
20 AGOG g AGOG—adv. 1. merrily, as in eager and wanton desire. 2.in joyful anticipation.
20

AGOG g AGOG—adv. 1. merrily, as in eager and wanton desire. 2.in joyful anticipation.

21 ULTRAMARINE AVENUES LIMPID THOROUGHFARE g LIMPID—adj. clear, free from obstruction. THOROUGHFARE—n. 1.a main road open at both ends. 2.path which serves as communication between two locations. Here, the “thoroughfare” acts as an axis around which the rest of the poem, east and west-ward portions, are symmetrically balanced. It also may suggest the unobstructed physical communication between lovers or one’s senses and the outside world.
21 ULTRAMARINE AVENUE'S LIMPID THOROUGHFARE. g LIMPID—adj. clear, free from obstruction. THOROUGHFARE—n. 1.a main road open at both ends. 2.path which serves as communication between two locations. Here, the “thoroughfare” acts as an axis around which the rest of the poem, east and west-ward portions, are symmetrically balanced. It also may suggest the unobstructed physical communication between lovers or one’s senses and the outside world.
21 ULTRAMARINE AVENUE'S LIMPID THOROUGHFARE. g LIMPID—adj. clear, free from obstruction. THOROUGHFARE—n. 1.a main road open at both ends. 2.path which serves as communication between two locations. Here, the “thoroughfare” acts as an axis around which the rest of the poem, east and west-ward portions, are symmetrically balanced. It also may suggest the unobstructed physical communication between lovers or one’s senses and the outside world.
21 ULTRAMARINE
21 ULTRAMARINE
22
22
22
22 AVENUES
22 AVENUES
23
23
23
23 LIMPID g LIMPID—adj. clear, free from obstruction.
23 LIMPID g LIMPID—adj. clear, free from obstruction.
24
24
24
24 THOROUGHFARE. g THOROUGHFARE—n. 1.a main road open at both ends. 2.path which serves as communication between two locations. Here, the “thoroughfare” acts as an axis around which the rest of the poem, east and west-ward portions, are symmetrically balanced. It also may suggest the unobstructed physical communication between lovers or one’s senses and the outside world.
24 THOROUGHFARE g THOROUGHFARE—n. 1.a main road open at both ends. 2.path which serves as communication between two locations. Here, the “thoroughfare” acts as an axis around which the rest of the poem, east and west-ward portions, are symmetrically balanced. It also may suggest the unobstructed physical communication between lovers or one’s senses and the outside world.
25 FLAMBOYANT STRUMPET
25
25
25
25
27
27 E.V.F.L.
27 E.V.F.L.
27
27
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