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Please note: This bibliography does not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Not all titles are available in print at the University of Maryland Libraries. Please contact Special Collections and University Archives for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "African American" returned 1488 results in 75 pages.

Showing results 101 through 120.

Allen, Gloria Seaman. “Early Nineteenth-Century African American Samplers from Baltimore Schools.” Piecework, 13 (November/December 2005): 26-31.

Allen, Gloria Seaman. “Slaves as Textile Artisans: Documentary Evidence for the Chesapeake Region.” Uncoverings, 22 (2001): 1-36.

Allen, Marcus Anthony. “Cautiously capitalistic: Black economic agency at the Savings Bank of Baltimore, 1850-1900.” Ph.D. diss., Morgan State University, 2013.

Alpert, Jonathan L. "The Origin of Slavery in the United States: The Maryland Precedent." American Journal of Legal History 14 (1970): 189-222.
Annotations / Notes: Maryland was the "first province in English North America to recognize slavery as a matter of law" (189). Therefore, the study of Maryland is useful for historians studying how American slavery was a product of the law. Early legislation recognized the existence of slavery, for while indentured servitude and slavery co-existed, and the terms were used interchangeably, the law still distinguished between the two. "All slaves were servants but not all servants were slaves" (193). However, it wasn't until 1664 when a statue was created which established slavery as hereditary. This statute was the first law in English North American to thus establish this type of slavery, legalizing what had been de facto since 1639. The author concludes that laws reflect the attitudes of a society and the manner in which societal problems are resolved. In the case of Maryland, servant problems could be avoided by replacing indentured servitude with perpetual slavery.

Alvarez, Rafael. “Last Call.” Maryland Life, 4 (November/December 2008): 94-99.

Anacker, K.B. “Transforming Race and Class in Suburbia: Decline in Metropolitan Baltimore.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 34 (no. 2, 2010): 448-50.

Anacker, Katrin B., James H. Carr, and Archana Pradhan. “Analyzing Foreclosures among High-Income Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino Borrowers in Prince George’s County, Maryland.” Housing & Society, 39 (no. 1, 2012): 1-28.

Anderson, Douglas. "The Textual Reproductions of Frederick Douglass." Clio 27 (Fall 1998): 57-87.

Anderson, George M. "Growth, Civil War, and Change: The Montgomery County Agricultural Society, 1850-1876." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Winter 1991): 396-406.

Anderson, George M., S. J. "Growing Sugar Cane in Montgomery County: A Mid-Nineteenth-Century Experiment by James W. Anderson." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Summer 1984): 134-41.

Anderson, Norman Reginald, Sr. "A Comparison of the College Aspirations and Achievements of Afro-American Secondary Students from a Rural County on the Eastern Shore of Maryland during Pre-Segregation (1965-1969), Immediate Desegregation (1970-1974), and Later Desegregation (1985-1989) Periods." Ed.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1992.
Category: African American

Anderson, Thornton. "Eighteenth-Century Suffrage: The Case of Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 76 (Summer 1981): 141-58.
Annotations / Notes: A study of the demographic data in Maryland's tax lists of the early national period with a focus on voter eligibility rather than voting records. The legal background of the voting franchise and earlier studies of suffrage in Maryland are also examined.

Anderson-Free, Corine F. "The Baltimore Colored Orchestra and the City Colored Chorus." Ph.D. diss., University of Alabama, 1994.

Antoniades, Christina Breda. “A Taste for Success.” Baltimore, 99 (October 2006): 122-27.
Category: African American

Antoniades, Christina. “The Unsinkable Sheila Dixon.” Baltimore, 101 (November 2008): 182-85, 236-39.
Category: African American | Women

Anyaso, Hilary Hurd. “Approaching Diversity from the Top Down.” Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 25 (October 16, 2008): 20-21.
Category: African American

Argersinger, Jo Ann E. Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.
Annotations / Notes: This book is especially relevant as the nation debates the privatization of social security. It considers the impact of the New Deal from the perspective of the city and the state rather than from the top down. Both Democratic Mayor Howard Jackson and Governor Albert C. Ritchie, a state's rights Democrat, were hostile to the centralizing policies of FDR's New Deal. The existing combination of private relief and public assistance which had developed in the 1920s, placing primary emphasis on faith based organizations to provide the basic safety net, was overwhelmed by the massive problems of the depression. It was only by the mid-1930s that this function was reorganized under municipal authority but the continued opposition of the Mayor and the Governor undermined this effort. Even with this bureaucratization of welfare, city workers continued to engage volunteer organizations to provide relief. Other aspects of the New Deal, such as labor unionization, and the problems faced by African Americans and women during the depression, are also considered.

Armstrong, Douglas V. “Political, Economic and Cultural Identity.” Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 18 (February 2008): 105-10.
Category: African American

Arpee, Marion. "Maryland Slaves in Hardey Wills and Indentures: 1718-1805." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Winter 1981): 24-27.

Arpee, Marion. "Maryland Slaves in Hardey Wills and Indentures: 1718-1805." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, 22 (Winter 1981): 24-27.