Search Results

Please note: These search results do not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Please contact the University of Maryland Libraries for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "Chesapeake Region" returned 664 results in 34 pages.

Showing results 181 through 200.

181)
Dorbin, Ann E. Saving the Bay: People Working for the Future of the Chesapeake. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.

182)
Dove, Tom. "Destination: Crisfield." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 26 (April 1997): 50-57.

183)
Du Bois, Christine Madeleine. "Race, Ethnicity, and Mass Media: Identities and Concerns about Reputation among Chesapeake-area West Indians." Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 2000.

184)
Duffy, Jim. “Only in the Movies.” Chesapeake Life, 8 (May/June 2002): 42-49.

185)
Duffy, Jim. “Take a Walk on the South Side.” Chesapeake Bay Magazine, 31 (March 2002): 50-55, 86-87.

186)
Dunn, Richard S. "Masters, Servants, and Slaves in the Colonial Chesapeake and the Caribbean." in Early Maryland in a Wider World, ed. by David B. Quinn. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1982, pp. 242-66.

187)
Dunn, Richard S. "Quantifying the History of the Chesapeake in the Eighteenth Century." Reviews in American History 15 (1987): 563-568.

188)
Dunning, Charles Mark. "Regulating Chesapeake Bay: An Inquiry into the Use of Federal Regulation to Control the Private Use of a Publicly Owned Natural Resource." Ph.D. diss., Washington University, 1984.

189)
Durgin, Teddy. "The Bay as Backdrop." Chesapeake Bay Magazine, 30 (March 2001): 18.

190)
Durgin, Teddy. "The Bay as Backdrop." Chesapeake Bay Magazine, 30 (March 2001): 18.

191)
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotations / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.

192)
Eberhardt, Lynne A. "Passion and Propriety: Tidewater Marriages in the Colonial Chesapeake." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Fall 1998): 324-47.

193)
Eden, Trudy Ann. " 'Makes Like, Makes Unlike': Food, Health, and Identity in the Early Chesapeake." Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1999.

194)
Edwards, Richard. Statistical Gazetteer of the State of Maryland, and the District of Columbia. Baltimore, MD: J.S. Waters, 1856.

195)
Eller, Ernest McNeill, ed. Chesapeake Bay in the American Revolution. Maryland Bicentennial Bookshelf. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publihers, 1981.
Annotations / Notes: collection of essays

196)
Ellis, Carolyn. Fisher Folk: Two Communities on the Chesapeake Bay. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1986.
Annotations / Notes: A sociological case study of two traditional water-economy Chesapeake Bay communities, one in tidewater Virginia and the other on the islands of Maryland, both assigned pseudonyms in social science convention. Ellis contends that these isolated settlements retain distinctive elements of traditional culture, even as they increasingly are drawn into contact with and impacted by outside forces. Based on extensive field research conducted in the 1970s and early 1980s, this study examines family and kin, work, social organization, the role of religion, and mechanisms of social control. Ellis concludes with consideration of the prospects for the future in terms of preservation or change for traditional Chesapeake area communities.

197)
Emerson, Matthew Charles. "Decorated Clay Tobacco Pipes from the Chesapeake." Ph.D. diss., University of California, Berkeley, 1988.

198)
Engerman, Stanley L. "Introduction to Special Issue on Colonial Slavery." Southern Studies 16 (1977): 347-354.

199)
Ernst, Joseph A., and H. Roy. Merrens. "'Camden's Turrets Pierce the Skies!': the Urban Process in the Southern Colonies During the Eighteenth Century." William and Mary Quarterly 30 (1973): 549-574.
Annotations / Notes: The authors advance the case that the conventional view that Southern colonies were devoid of urbanization derives from a confusion of form and function, as well as size and significance. The article presents case studies of Camden, South Carolina, and Cross Creek, North Carolina, as well as examples from Virginia and Maryland, to demonstrate that towns often played an important urban function in the economy of the Southern colonies, though their examples are hardly convincing in contradicting the prevailing interpretation.

200)
Eshelman, Ralph and Burton Kummerow. In Full Glory Reflected: Discovering the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 2012.