Search Results

Please note: This bibliography does not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Not all titles are available in print at the University of Maryland Libraries. Please contact Special Collections and University Archives for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "Women" returned 1031 results in 52 pages.

Showing results 221 through 240.

221)
Cantave, Sophia. “‘De Understadin to Go ‘Long wid It’: W.E.B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Black Diaspora in the Americas.” Ph.D. diss., Tufts University, 2011.

222)
Card, Nan. “Lucy Hayes’ Visit to Wounded Ohioans after the Battle of South Mountain MD.” Ohio Civil War Genealogy Journal, 16 (September 2012): 144-45.

223)
Carey, Stefanie. “Pauline Williams Bennett: A Spirit Tamed But Not Broken.” The Record, 101 (May 2007): 3-5.

224)
Carey, Stefanie. “Pauline Williams Bennett: A Spirit Tamed But Not Broken.” The Record, 101 (May 2007): 3-5.

225)
Carl, Nancy Nolf. "Claire McCardell, a Maryland Original." Maryland Humanities , (September 2000): 15-17.

226)
Carpio, Glenda R. “The Newly Complicated Zora Neale Hurston.” Chronicle of Higher Education, 57 (January 7, 2011): B6-B10.

227)
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Planter's Wife: The Experience of White Women in Seventeenth Century Maryland." William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series 34 (October 1977): 542-71.
Annotations / Notes: Most women coming to Maryland in the seventeenth century were indentured servants between ages eighteen and twenty-five. Hard work in the tobacco fields, late marriage, and early death awaited them. However, for the woman who survived seasoning and their period of service, the sexual imbalance let them choose her husband and seize the opportunity to become a planter's wife. She risked childbirth, bore three to four children, and hoped one or two lived to adulthood. Widows remarried quickly, and complex families were the norm.

228)
Carroll, Rebecca E. Snapshots from the Life of an African-American Woman. Baltimore: C. H. Fairfax Company, 2001.
Category: African American | Women

229)
Carson, Warren Jason, Jr. "Zora Neale Hurston: The Early Years, 1921-1934." Ph.D. diss., University of South Carolina, 1998.

230)
Carter, Cora Rice. “Cora’s Story: Growing Up on Fire Clay Mountain.” Journal of the Alleghenies, 40 (2004): 73-101.
Category: Women | Allegany County

231)
Carter, Ola Mae. "An Oyster Shucker's Story." SlackWater, 4 (Spring 2004): 58-65.
Category: Women

232)
Caruthers, Jack M. "Ruth Enlow Library." Glades Star 6 (March 1991): 528-29.

233)
Cashin, Joan E., ed. Our Common Affairs: Texts from Women in the Old South. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Category: Women | Other

234)
Cassie, Ron, ed. “Shattering the Glass Ceiling.” Baltimore, 107 (May 2014): 132-39.
Category: Women

235)
Cassie, Ron. “Breaking the Habit.” Baltimore, 102 (June 2009): 88-91.
Category: Women

236)
Cassie, Ron. “When you’re going through hell, keep on going.” Baltimore, 102 (March 2009): 110-13, 176-77.
Category: Women

237)
Cavanaugh, Joanne P. "Women of War." Johns Hopkins Magazine 50 (November 1998): 46-54.

238)
Cawley, Alexa. “Annicake Hanson Elinor Meconny Dabb.” Isle of Kent, (Winter 2012): 4.

239)
Challinor, Joan R. "'A Quarter Taint of Maryland Blood': An Inquiry into the Anglo/Maryland Background of Mrs. John Quincy Adams." Calvert Historian 10 (Spring 1995): 19-48.

240)
Champion, Laurie and Bruce A. Glasrud. "Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960)." in African American Authors, 1745-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook edited by Emmanuel S. Nelson. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2000.