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Please note: These search results do not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Please contact the University of Maryland Libraries for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "Twentieth Century" returned 2706 results in 136 pages.

Showing results 281 through 300.

281)
Anson, Melanie D. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotations / Notes: Sudbrook Park is one of the few neighborhoods where Frank Law Olmsted's plan was carried out to its entirety. It is a nationally significant example of community design. It was the first, and most important, Olmsted suburb in the region.

282)
Anson, Melanie. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore, MD: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotations / Notes: Anson chronicles the history of Baltimore County's Sudbrook Park, a significant example of a residential community planned by noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. Olmsted's "General Plan for Sudbrook" in 1889 epitomized the suburban ideal which he championed, with its separation from the city, yet link for commuting via the nearby Western Maryland Railway line; spacious lots and set backs for cottage-style houses; shared common spaces and amenities; and romantic, naturalistic setting. Anson traces the evolution of the development of Sudbrook, as well as the nature of community social life from the 1890s to the present.

283)
Appel, Walter A. Trackside Along the B&O 1957-1958 with Edward P. Griffith. Scotch Plains, NJ: Morning Sun Books, 2000.

284)
Archambault, Alan H. "World War II Murals at Fort George Meade." Military Collector and Historian Category: Fine and Decorative Arts | Military | Twentieth Century

285)
Archives and Manuscripts. The Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1980.

286)
Argersinger, Jo Ann E. "'The Right to Strike': Labor Organization and the New Deal in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine, 78 (Winter 1983): 299-318.

287)
Argersinger, Jo Ann E. "Assisting the 'Loafers': Transient Relief in Baltimore, 1933-1937." Labor History, 23 (Spring 1082): 226-45.

288)
Argersinger, Jo Ann E. "Toward a Roosevelt Coalition: The Democratic Party and the New Deal in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 82 (Winter 1987): 288-305.

289)
Argersinger, Jo Ann E. Making the Amalgamated: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Baltimore Clothing Industry, 1899-1939. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

290)
Argersinger, Jo Ann E. Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.
Annotations / Notes: This book is especially relevant as the nation debates the privatization of social security. It considers the impact of the New Deal from the perspective of the city and the state rather than from the top down. Both Democratic Mayor Howard Jackson and Governor Albert C. Ritchie, a state's rights Democrat, were hostile to the centralizing policies of FDR's New Deal. The existing combination of private relief and public assistance which had developed in the 1920s, placing primary emphasis on faith based organizations to provide the basic safety net, was overwhelmed by the massive problems of the depression. It was only by the mid-1930s that this function was reorganized under municipal authority but the continued opposition of the Mayor and the Governor undermined this effort. Even with this bureaucratization of welfare, city workers continued to engage volunteer organizations to provide relief. Other aspects of the New Deal, such as labor unionization, and the problems faced by African Americans and women during the depression, are also considered.

291)
Argersinger, Jo Ann Eady. "Baltimore: The Depression Years." Ph.D. diss., George Washington University, 1980.

292)
Argersinger, Peter H. "From Party Tickets to Secret Ballots: The Evolution of the Electoral Process in Maryland During the Gilded Age." Maryland Historical Magazine 82 (Fall 1987): 214-39.

293)
Argersinger, Peter H. "From Party Tickets to Secret Ballots: The Evolution of the Electoral Process in Maryland during the Gilded Age." In Structure, Process, and Party: Essays in American Political History. Edited by Peter H. Argersinger, 122-49. Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1992.

294)
Armour, Mark and Malcolm Allen, eds. Pitching, Defense, and Three-Run Homers: The 1970 Baltimore Orioles. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2012.

295)
Armstrong, Kimberly. "Vindex: A Maryland Ghost Town." Journal of the Alleghenies 31 (1995): 119-24.

296)
Arnold, Joseph L. "Baltimore's Neighborhoods, 1800-1980." Working Papers from the Regional Economic History Research Center, 4 (1981): 76-98.

297)
Arnold, Joseph L. "Suburban Growth and Municipal Annexation in Baltimore, 1745-1918." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (June 1978): 109-28.
Annotations / Notes: The battles between Baltimore City and Baltimore County over the suburban territory spanning a century and a half. This fight was for a larger tax base and the promise of better services providing an important historical perspective on current city-suburban problems.

298)
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Last of the Good Old Days: Politics in Baltimore, 1920-1950." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Fall 1976): 443-48.
Annotations / Notes: Changes in the patterns of Democratic politics rather than the effects of Progressive Era reforms ended the Rasin-Gorman political machine in Maryland in the early twentieth century. Individual leaders, such as "Sonny" Mahon and William Curran, and their relationships, not the total organizational structure, determine the continuing strength of machine control.

299)
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.

300)
Arnold, Joseph L. The New Deal in the Suburbs: A History of the Greenbelt Town Program, 1935-1954. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1971.
Annotations / Notes: Considering the variety of Maryland's various planned communities - Columbia, Bowie, Greenbelt and Roland Park - it is important to appreciate how each was distinctive. At its conception, Greenbelt, along with several other communities planned and built by Rexford Guy Tugwell's Resettlement Administration, represented the social experimentation associated with New Deal. According to the author: "the greenbelt towns were built to demonstrate that urban expansion by the construction of complete new towns would provide superior safety, convenience, beauty, and a deep sense of community spirit - all at a new low cost. These new suburban towns would therefore provide a superior environment for families heretofore condemned to live in urban slums. New towns would stop urban decay and end economic segregation of the suburbs." (p. xii) What was radical was the comprehensive scope of the enterprise, the creation of co-operative businesses to serve the community, and the fact that the federal government maintained ownership. This study ends with the implementation of Public Law 65 (1949) which transferred ownership of most of the houses to a private co-operative.