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Please note: These search results do not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Please contact the University of Maryland Libraries for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "Civil War" returned 373 results in 19 pages.

Showing results 41 through 60.

41)
Barney, William L. “The Urban South and the Coming of the Civil War.” Civil War History, 52 (September 2006): 318-19.

42)
Barton, Donald Scott. "Divided Houses: The Civil War Party System in the Border States." Ph.D. diss., Texas A&M University, 1991.

43)
Bearss, Edwin C. "1862 Brings Hard Times to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal." West Virginia History 30 (January 1969): 436-62.

44)
Bearss, Edwin C. "War Comes to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal." West Virginia History, 29 (April 1968): 153-77.

45)
Beasley, Joy. “Current Archeological Research at Monocacy National Battlefield.” Maryland Archeology, 39 (March-September 2003): 27-30.

46)
Bennett, Joyce. “Lee’s Miserables.” Chronicles of St. Mary’s, 54 (Spring 2006): 311-12.
Category: Military | Civil War

47)
Berlin, Ira, et al., eds. Free At Last: A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom, and the Civil War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
Annotations / Notes: Based upon the Freedman's Papers collection at the National Archives, this volume covers the comprehensive African American experience from slavery to freedom. Organized around primary documents, with short explanatory introductions, it explores various significant themes in this complex transformation. African Americans discovered that northerners, as well as former masters, were reluctant to recognize their equality and often imposed their views on such things as labor relations, the extent of personal freedom, and their proper role in the military. This book reveals that former slaves possessed a complex and sophisticated understanding of the meaning of freedom.

48)
Berlin, Ira, et al., eds. Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867. Series I, Volume II. The Wartime Genesis of Free Labor: The Upper South. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985.
Annotations / Notes: Based upon the Freedman's Papers collection at the National Archives, this volume focuses on the genesis of free labor. Chapter 4, which presents an essay followed by original documents, is devoted to the Maryland experience. Although slavery and free labor co-existed throughout the 19th century, slavery had been concentrated in Southern Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, and it was here that the greatest tension existed during the Civil War era. Runaway slaves quickly appeared at unionist camps, such as Point Lookout, or escaped to the national capital, in search of freedom and employment. By 1864 several government farms were created along the Patuxent River from abandoned property which was home to over 600 former slaves. Former slaves discovered that emancipation did not mean freedom. The state legislature, still under the influence of former slave owners, passed restrictive laws circumscribing their freedom, including an apprenticeship law which allowed white landowners to forcefully "apprentice" black children. The Union commander, General Lew Wallace, attempted to counteract this program by issuing General Order 112, but the effort was not supported by the national government.

49)
Berlin, Ira, et al., eds. Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867. Series II. The Black Military Experience. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.
Annotations / Notes: Based upon the Freedman's Papers collection at the National Archives, this volume focuses on the black military experience. Unlike most of the previous volumes, where there was an entire chapter devoted to Maryland, references to the state are scattered throughout the book. By the spring of 1865 some 179,000 black men enlisted in the Union army, of which 8,718 were from Maryland. These figures do not include service in the naval forces. Black enlistment helped to undermine slavery but it also contributed to a shortage of labor in rural areas. The families of enlistees were often ill-treated. Once in the Army, blacks were discouraged by unequal pay and by doing more manual labor than fighting. By the end of the war, however, black units fought with distinction. In Maryland, like other border states, black veterans were the objects of widespread terror as the former planter class attempted to reassert its hegemony.

50)
Berlin, Ira, Francine C. Cary, Steven F. Miller, and Leslie S. Rowland. "Family and Freedom: Black Families in the American Civil War." History Today [Great Britain] 37 (1987): 8-15.

51)
Bernard, Kenneth A. "Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War." Lincoln Herald 66 (1964): 115-134.

52)
Besch, Edwin W., Michael Hammerson, and Dave W. Morgan. "Raphael Semmes, the English 'Confederate Parson' and his Maiden Sister Louisa: A Cased Presentation Revolver, a Magnificent Silver-mounted Sword, and a 'Mammoth' Silk Confederate Second National Flag." Military Collector and Historian, 53 (Winter 2001-2002): 146-60.

53)
Betterly, Richard. "Seize Mr. Lincoln." Civil War Times Illustrated 25 (February 1987): 14-21.
Annotations / Notes: 1861 Baltimore plot.

54)
Billingsley, Andrew. "Family Reunion-The Legacy of Robert Smalls: Civil War Hero." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1993): 14-17.

55)
Blackburn, George M., ed. "The Negro as Viewed by a Michigan Civil War Soldier: Letters of John C. Buchanan." Michigan History 47 (1963): 75-84.

56)
Blakey, Arch Frederick. General John H. Winder, C.S.A. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1990.

57)
Blassingame, John W. "The Recruitment of Colored Troops in Kentucky, Maryland and Missouri, 1863-1865." Historian, 29 (August 1967): 533-45.

58)
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

59)
Bohannon, Keith, ed. "Wounded & Captured at Gettysburg: Reminiscence by Sgt. William Jones, 50th Georgia Infantry." Military Images 9 (1988): 14-15.

60)
Bowling, Garth, Jr. "Charles County's Georgetown Alumni During the Civil War." The Record, 67 (April 1995): 1.