Search Results

Please note: These search results do not contain links to electronic articles hosted by the University of Maryland Libraries, although some may be available online. Please contact the University of Maryland Libraries for assistance in obtaining copies of any of the articles cited in this bibliography.

Your search in the category "African American" returned 1439 results in 72 pages.

Showing results 81 through 100.

81)
“Underground Railroad.” Glades Star, 9 (March 2002): 498-99; Glades Star, 9 (June 2002): 548-49.
Category: African American

82)
“University of Maryland Eastern Shore Aims to Start First Golf Degree at HBCU.” Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 22 (November 17, 2005): 12.

83)
“University of Maryland Eastern Shore Baseball Coach Honored by Hispanic Sports Hall of Fame.” Black Issues in Higher Education, 22 (July 14, 2005): 18.

84)
“University of Maryland to Investigate Its Ties to Slavery.” Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 59 (Spring 2008): 33.

85)
McConnell, Catherine Taylor. "Eastern Shore Church with Early Origins in Afro-American Culture Starts a New Life." Maryland Pendulum, Summer 1991, p. 5.

86)
McConnell, Catherine Taylor. "Eastern Shore Church with Early Origins in Afro-American Culture Starts a New Life." Maryland Pendulum, Summer 1991, p. 5.

87)
Abingbade, Harrison Ola. "The Settler-African Conflicts: The Case of the Maryland Colonists and the Grebo 1840-1900." Journal of Negro History 66 (Summer 1981): 93-109.

88)
Abraham, Curtis. “Dr Henson, I Presume.” New African, 483 (April 2009): 64-67.

89)
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.

90)
Adams, Marseta. "H. Rap Brown: 'Fight for your Rights.'" Calvert Historian 11 (Fall 1996): 53-67.

91)
Aidt-Guy, Anita Louise. "Persistent Maryland: Anti-slavery Activity between 1850 and 1864." Ph.D. diss., Georgetown University, 1994.

92)
Alford, Terry, ed. "'Formerly a Slave': Frederick Douglass Comes to Lanesborough." New England Quarterly 60 (1987): 86-88.

93)
Allen, David. "A Brief History of Lawyers in Maryland." Negro History Bulletin 49 (January-March 1986): 17-20.

94)
Allen, David. "A Brief History of Lawyers in Maryland." Negro History Bulletin, 49 (January-March 1986): 17-20.

95)
Allen, Gloria Seaman. "Threads of Bondage: Chesapeake Slave Women and Plantation Cloth Production, 1750-1850." Ph.D. diss., George Washington University, 2000.

96)
Allen, Gloria Seaman. “African American Samplers from Antebellum Baltimore.” Antiques, 165 (April 2004): 134-43.

97)
Allen, Gloria Seaman. “Early Nineteenth-Century African American Samplers from Baltimore Schools.” Piecework, 13 (November/December 2005): 26-31.

98)
Allen, Gloria Seaman. “Slaves as Textile Artisans: Documentary Evidence for the Chesapeake Region.” Uncoverings, 22 (2001): 1-36.

99)
Allen, Marcus Anthony. “Cautiously capitalistic: Black economic agency at the Savings Bank of Baltimore, 1850-1900.” Ph.D. diss., Morgan State University, 2013.

100)
Alpert, Jonathan L. "The Origin of Slavery in the United States: The Maryland Precedent." American Journal of Legal History 14 (1970): 189-222.
Annotations / Notes: Maryland was the "first province in English North America to recognize slavery as a matter of law" (189). Therefore, the study of Maryland is useful for historians studying how American slavery was a product of the law. Early legislation recognized the existence of slavery, for while indentured servitude and slavery co-existed, and the terms were used interchangeably, the law still distinguished between the two. "All slaves were servants but not all servants were slaves" (193). However, it wasn't until 1664 when a statue was created which established slavery as hereditary. This statute was the first law in English North American to thus establish this type of slavery, legalizing what had been de facto since 1639. The author concludes that laws reflect the attitudes of a society and the manner in which societal problems are resolved. In the case of Maryland, servant problems could be avoided by replacing indentured servitude with perpetual slavery.