Tuesday, July 29, 2014
McKeldin 08:00AM - 10:00PM

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10:00AM - 04:00PM
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08:00AM - 09:00PM
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in Hornbake

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in Hornbake

10:00AM - 05:00PM
MSPAL 09:00AM - 09:00PM
Shady Grove See here for hours
International Piano Archives at Maryland

Hours:

By appointment,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday

Contact:

Donald Manildi
IPAM Curator
 
Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library
University of Maryland
2511 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
College Park, MD 20742-1630
(301) 405-9224
E-mail: godowsky@umd.edu


Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt was born in Raiding, Hungary on October 22, 1811. There were three main periods of Liszt's life. His first was primarily as a pianist (childhood to 1847). The second was a period of composition and promotion (1848 to 1861) and the third was devoted to composition and education. His initial piano study was at the hand of his father, Adam Liszt. Liszt's first public performance took place at the age of nine. His performance garnered him the interest and support of some Hungarian noblemen who funded his studies for the next few years. Liszt then moved to Vienna where he studied under Czerny. While in Vienna, Liszt met Beethoven and Schubert.

In 1827, Liszt's father died and he began to provide for his mother through frequent public concerts. In 1833, Liszt met Countess Marie d'Agoult, with whom he had a lengthy relationship and had three children. Liszt continued to tour throughout Europe and his excursions from 1838 to 1847 were highly praised. From 1848 to 1861, Liszt published the Transcendental Etudes, Paganini Etudes, Hungarian Rhapsodies, twelve Symphonic Poems, the Faust and Dante Symphonies and other works. In 1849, Liszt settled in Weimar to conduct the Court Theater for twelve years. During his Weimar years and until his death, liszt offered frequent master classes that were attended by countless aspiring pianists from all over the world. At the same time, his piano works took on a much more experimental and less virtuosic character than previously. He died in Bayreuth, Germany on July 31, 1886.