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Rogue Librarians: Preserve Govt Information Before It Disappears

Posted: Feb 16, 2017

Out-of-date Warning This news post is more than three months old and may contain out-of-date information.

 

A GUIDE FOR ROGUE LIBRARIANS:   
Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information 

 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21


2 - 3:00 pm  Webcast
3 - 3:30 pm  Guest Panel
Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, Multipurpose Room 

 

WEBINAR 

Fair use plays a crucial role as copyright’s safety valve for free expression because it permits unauthorized copying in service of the public good. This role, which enables everything from scathing reviews of artwork to wholesale digitization of books for accessibility, is taking on new currency as librarians scramble to preserve contested government information online. 

From deleted climate data, disappearing government web pages, and ephemeral political tweets, fair use cuts through the legal confusion so we can maintain the historical and scientific record. This webinar will introduce fair use as an equitable doctrine designed to support librarianship and prepare participants to apply fair use in their own communities’ work.
 

GUEST SPEAKERS 

Amy Ginther, IT Specialist with Security/Project NEThics in the Division of Information Technology, will discuss the process through which the university, as an online service provider, claims safe harbor from copyright infringement liability.  She will also mention additional ways in which Project NEThics, the group charged with promoting the responsible use of information technology through user education and policy enforcement, addresses intellectual property issues.

Joseph Koivisto, one of our Systems Librarians, who deals with Consortial Libraries Applications Support, is attending a DataRescueDC event February 18th-19th to help archive and describe digital research data funded and hosted by federal research agencies. He will share his experience at the event and some of his expertise with archiving data.

Adam Kriesberg, a Post-Doctoral Scholar at Maryland's iSchool, works on projects related to agricultural data curation. He also is attending the Saving Data Event happening this weekend and will share some insights into that event and his own experience with archiving government data.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Hosted by University Libraries Copyright Discussion Group

 

Photo credit: Nova deViator (www.flickr.com/photos/novaviator)