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Resources for Instructors:

For more information on our library sessions, see our Guide for ENGL101 faculty. To schedule an instruction session, visit our policies page

ENGL 101: Academic Writing

Learning Outcomes

By the end of their first library research session, students will be able to...

  • identify types of authority, such as subject expertise, societal position, or special experiences
  • differentiate a scholarly article from other information formats by describing characteristics of a scholarly article
  • formulate effective search strategies in library databases, such as Academic Search Complete, to locate relevant information sources for their topics
  • identify at least three ways to contact a librarian for research assistance
  • recognize the limitations of citation generators and identify alternate citation resources, such as Purdue OWL

By the end of their second library workshop session, students will be able to...

  • identify which types of authority are best suited for specific assignments (for example, the digital forum assignment vs. the argument of inquiry assignment)
  • recognize that scholarly sources are not always the most appropriate format for their information need and identify alternate information sources 
  • identify stakeholders for their topic and locate sources that represent a specific stakeholder's viewpoint
  • articulate the value of seeking diverse perspectives in their research
  • create strategies to overcome perceived barriers to research and identify additional search strategies (keywords, filters, etc) and resources (subject-specific databases, relevant popular publications)

Research Activities: 

Brainstorming Activity: To help develop a research question from a broad topic, use the quadrant below to guide a discussion. Start with a broad idea - such as climate change - and gradually narrow down your focus by answering the following questions: 

What? 

  • What is your topic? What other issues/events are similar or related to your topic? 

Who? 

  • Who is affected by your topic? Who is involved?

How? 

  • How does your topic impact society, culture, politics, economics? 

Why? 

  • Why does this topic matter to you? Why should it matter to others? 

Evaluating Authority Activity: Using the articles below, evaluate sources for authority, relevance, and credibility. You may use this Evaluating Information Sources worksheet to guide your conversation. 

Topics:

Women in STEM

Marching as Political Activism